We were entertained by the salutations from “the gods” to the dress circle. We asked George what “the gods” were known as in the West. He gave us a variety of synonyms. The one we liked best was the “peanut heaven” because the occupants are so high up and find a good part of their entertainment in consuming peanuts. Can you adopt it?… Stornoway 24th Nov. 1918

Extract from letter from Mr Gibson to Jean Gibson 24th November 1918

Mr Gibson is taken with Canadian theatrical slang, and tells of having received a dinner invitation from Lord Leverhulme; meanwhile, Barrie the cat is taking advantage of cousin George. The next in our series of letters from the W.J. Gibson collection held by Museum nan Eilean. Please get in touch if you have any comments: archives@cne-siar.gov.uk

Jean dear,

Got your letter this morning by going to the post-office. Found it short, but interesting.

Moral essay – 1st.  Well done! Good old Plato and the Clarion. Was that the combination? I begin to think you are going to have a deal to live up to this session – with a Mor. Phil. essay first, a Chemi. exam. with 100%, and your English.

As regards the English essay, cannot you take the fairies. Your study of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” wd save you from having much reading to do on the Shakespeare side, and the Pope part of it cd be soon done. It seems to me immensely more attractive than the Dryden theme.

We were entertained by the salutations from “the gods” to the dress circle. We asked George what “the gods” were known as in the West. He gave us a variety of synonyms. The one we liked best was the “peanut heaven” because the occupants are so high up and find a good part of their entertainment in consuming peanuts. Can you adopt it?

He and Mamma are at church to-night and Barrie and I are in possession of the study. The Funnells go south to-night. Mrs. Funnell was in saying goodbye last night and I saw Mr. Funnell in the street in the evening.

Yesterday afternoon when George and I were down at the quay he came across a lad who was at college with him in Alberta. He is called Macaulay, and turns out to be an Old Nicolsonian of the time immediately prior to my coming to Stornoway. We had him up to tea with us in the evening and he took dummy’s place in our whist game. He seems a nice lad.

Lord Leverhulme came last night. An invitation has come asking me to dinner on Tuesday evening. I have not yet made up my mind whether I am going. Mamma wants me to. It seems to be a men’s gathering.

Another parliamentary candidate, a Mr. Cotes [sic; should be Cotts] from Liverpool, I think, has appeared on the scene. We’ll soon have enough.

George will not travel before Tuesday night; his warrant has not come. One of the persons he specially wants to see is Mr. Murray, Torry. He’ll be able to visit him on one of his forenoons when you are at your classes. His best way will be to give you word, by telegram or special messenger, on the first morning he is in Aberdeen and then to call out at the Residence at 2 o’clock after your lunch.  You’ll then be able to let him see over King’s first. But he’ll give you word himself in good time.

Mamma and he have just come in. Barrie has quite adopted him and is at present spread out on the knee of his beautiful riding breeches.

Mamma has been too busy to write you.

Our best love.

Papa

Ref: 1992.50.64.iii/L13

Transcribed by Dawn MacDonald, Archives Assistant

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