The Board met yesterday and appointed as successor to Mr. Tait another Mr. Tait, this time, from Wishaw. They also appointed Annice Macleod as we feared they would. Papa went to the meeting and gave his reasons for thinking Annice unsuitable….. Annice has really “a cheek of brass” as my mother used to say to want to come back to this school. However we must hope she will do better than we think likely…..Stornoway, 13th June, 1918

Extract of letter from Mrs Gibson to Jean Gibson 13th June 1918

Mrs Gibson tells Jean about a controversial appointment for a post [of gymnastics teacher] at the Nicolson Institute – the appointee has “a cheek of brass”. She also suggests Browning as a good essay topic. The next in our series of letters from the W.J. Gibson collection held by Museum nan Eilean. Please get in touch if you have any comments: archives@cne-siar.gov.uk

Dear Sheann,

We got your letter yesterday and were much interested in all you were doing.  You however omitted to send the exam. papers in English as you said you were doing and Papa would like to see it and me, of course.  (That “me” I suppose should be “I”).  Browning would make a quite good essay for you I fancy.  At any rate you really know some of Browning, which would be an advantage.

Papa met Mrs. Mackenzie one day and she was telling him that Jean is not going to Edinburgh but to Birmingham.  Also that Muriel had got a post on some Enclyclopedia I think, to work in Aberdeen and to live at Cults or rather Bieldside.

The Board met yesterday and appointed as successor to Mr. Tait another Mr. Tait, this time, from Wishaw.  They also appointed Annice Macleod as we feared they would.  Papa went to the meeting and gave his reasons for thinking Annice unsuitable.  Then they voted and there were 3 for and 3 against.  Roddie Morrison was in the chair and he gave the casting vote for Annice.  Provost Maclean, Roddie Smith and R. Morrison were Annice’s supporters.  Ex provost Anderson, Capt. Watt and Mackenzie, Back against.  It was a pity Mr. Macintyre wasn’t there.  Annice has really “a cheek of brass” as my mother used to say to want to come back to this school.  However we must hope she will do better than we think likely.

I was over this afternoon seeing Annie Macleod.  She has been very unwell lately not with her asthma but sick and with a very high temperature.  She is some what better than she was though far from well.  Her mother also was laid up with a bad chest but is up again though feeling very weak.  Poor Dina has an anxious time and much work with home and school.  She is to be bridesmaid at Maggie Miller’s wedding if her people at home can be left, which just at present seems unlikely.

We were glad to see that Maud is keeping better.  She mustn’t worry about her exams.  It is disappointing I know but isn’t as if Maud were pressed for time by financial reasons.  Indeed the measles may have saved her from a breakdown, and she should try to look at it that way.  I never see her mother at all.  Mr. John Macrae has been home on draft leave and leaves again tonight.  There is a gale blowing and the trees are being dashed about in the wildest way.  It is a pity as everything was looking so very well.

I see the lists of passes for Glas. Univ. in the Herald day by day, a sign that the session draws near its close.  Bessie will probably be home before you this time.  Papa has now come in from his shooting and is going to sign reports midnight oil and so on.

Love from us both to Sheann.

Your loving Ma

Ref: 1992.50.64ii/L61

Transcribed by Dawn MacDonald, Archives Collections Assistant

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