Did I tell you that the Germans had shelled St. Kilda? 72 shells were found but as the people had fled to the hill no one was killed. It was specially at the wireless they were firing and they did not manage to strike the mast, only some of the stays. Mr. Crichton was out in one of the whalers to advise about repairs. He brought Papa a piece of one of the shells… Stornoway, 6th June. 1918

Extract from letter from Mrs Gibson to Jean Gibson 6th June 1918

Mrs Gibson has concerning news for Jean this week regarding the shelling carried out by the Germans in St. Kilda – luckily no one was harmed. She also fills Jean in on the latest regarding their sea trips on the “Naughty Lass”. The next in our series of letters from the W.J. Gibson collection held by Museum nan Eilean. Please get in touch if you have any comments: archives@cne-siar.gov.uk

Dear Jean,

I have just finished scrubbing out the kitchen etc. (oich! oich!) and now to get your letter written before tea.

In the first place I am sorry about Maud’s German Measles and hope it may not upset her course so much as she fears.  At any rate it will take her away from the hard work for a bit and that won’t be a bad thing.  Fancy her not able to get to your play!  It seems to me just a little too too.[?]

I never see Mrs. Morison so had not heard Maud was ill.  Mrs. Clark was telling me that Mrs. M. has “a big servant” now and is getting the spring cleaning done.  We saw Mr. Morrison on Sunday sitting large and solitary in his pew.  Probably Mrs. M. was at home with her legs as she herself would put it, and then join the listener in laughing at the expression.

On Tuesday we spent the evening on the water.  Miss Nicolson and Miss McColl were with us.  The evening was peaceful and we all enjoyed it very much.  Miss Nicolson caught a nice lythe, the first fish she ever caught.  Having been reared inland the sea is a great novelty to her.  We were not home till nearly 12 and then the tide was so low that we could not get the boat up the slip.  Papa came home and got his bread and milk and went down again to do it.  As he did not return till about 1.30 you may imagine my state of mind.  I stood outside the front door but did not allow myself to go down to look for him.  By and by he arrived leisurely exclaiming “My! Why aren’t you in bed?”  It was a wonderful evening.  The sea was full of jelly-fishes as it used to be in Loch Erisort, lovely lavender ones.

Did I tell you that the Germans had shelled St. Kilda?  72 shells were found but as the people had fled to the hill no one was killed.  It was specially at the wireless they were firing and they did not manage to strike the mast, only some of the stays.  Mr. Crichton was out in one of the whalers to advise about repairs.  He brought Papa a piece of one of the shells.

The latest new teacher is called Maud, Miss Maud Rae Mitchell from St. Andrews with hons. in classics.  3rd Cl. to be sure but still she has taken the hons. course.  There is one applicant so far for Mr. Tait’s place but we hope there may be more yet.

Quite a small gale is blowing here today, no rain but lots of dust and the wind quite warm.  It has been very dark all day but still the rain has kept off.  The season is so early here that the laburnums will soon be open.  The lupins are in full bloom and ever so high.  Dr. Robertson was in one evening and was telling me that if rain does not come soon the crops out Barvas way will suffer.

Hope you will find Saturday’s exam. suit you

Love from us both.  The Lil Small is asleep on his chair.

Your loving Ma.

Ref: 1992.50.64ii/L59

Transcribed by Dawn MacDonald, Archive collections assistant

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.