Dr. Robertson is here just now and thinks more of the teachers will be called up soon. However we need not anticipate trouble and of course if necessary there can be nothing said. The successful prosecution of the war takes precedence of all else… Stornoway, 4th Feb. 1917

Extract from letter from Mrs Gibson to Jean Gibson 4 Feb 1917

In her letter to Jean this week, Mrs Gibson has news of a local boy who has returned home from the Struma front on sick leave having had malaria, and the possibility of more teachers being called up hangs heavy over the school. The next in our series of letters from the W.J. Gibson collection held by Museum nan Eilean. Please get in touch if you have any comments: archives@cne-siar.gov.uk

Dear Jean,

Your letter came at the right time this week and we found it interesting as we always do.  What are you going to sing I wonder. I hope the Maths.  ‘At Home’ will be as nice as the Latin one was.  We note all your remarks about your exams. marks and studies generally but I leave that for Papa to reply to as I really am not in a position to know much about it.  Do your best and be sure it will be all right.  We were interested to hear that “Chrissy Kirkcaldy” had written you.  We have always felt disappointed that she did not get to the University.

Papa’s cold is nearly away now.  It has been bad in his head all week and a great deal of nose blowing and sneezing going on but he got over the body symptoms the two days he was in bed. The weather has been very cold and yesterday and today we have snow, the dry powdery kind blowing like smoke before the wind.

Yesterday Papa and I had a walk before dinner out to Sandwick through the cemetery and home by the beach and Newton.  Met Miss Mary Pope near the gas-house.  She had been at a chrystoleum [sic] painting class held by Mrs. Matthew Morrison.  I wonder now if they wouldn’t be better doing something more useful in these days. In the evening Mr. Ewen came in to pay us a visit and while he was here a Battery boy came in home on sick leave from the Struma front, Murdo Maciver, a brother of the girl who is somewhat lame.  He had had malaria and dysentery and had been in hospital at Malta and then in England but is now quite better and ready to go out again.

I wasn’t at the sewing meeting on Wednesday as I was expecting the plumber.  I need hardly add he hasn’t come yet.  On Thursday I went to the B.W.T.A.  The kept me so long in the post office where I had gone with your parcel that I didn’t get in till 4.30 and at 20 to 5 we were out.  There were only six present including me which is too bad treatment of the new Secy.

Dr. Robertson is here just now and thinks more of the teachers will be called up soon.  However we need not anticipate trouble and of course if necessary there can be nothing said. The successful prosecution of the war takes precedence of all else.  I haven’t seen Mrs. Morison yet, I suppose she is just as busy as I am.

Met Mr. Clark on our way home from church.  He says they had a wire from Bessie yesterday asking if she might go to live with the Walkers at Carluke as they wanted her.  They agreed meantime.  He says Bessie won’t be home at Easter but I hope she will.  Papa is deep in “Their Silver Wedding Journey” and smiled a far-away smile when I asked him for news.  Doubtless he’s keeping it for his own letter. 

Love from us both to our little She-ann.

Your loving

Mother.

Ref: 1992.50.64i/L28

Transcribed by Barry Shelby, Museum Visitor Assistant

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