Author Archives: Archivist (Editor)

Mr. Menzies was in at the school seeing Papa and telling him about the boys. He has a high opinion of Zadok it seems. He says that the Lewis section of the Battery are looked on as the intellectuals which is what one would expect. I saw Mr. Menzies at the sale and he told me that he discovered in conversation with Papa that he knows far more about the boys than their padre did… Stornoway, 13th December. 1917

This week, Mrs Gibson has updates for Jean on who is and who isn’t coming home for the holidays, she reports on a small sale she attended during the week, and mentions the Lewis section of the Battery. Mrs Gibson … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Mr. Menzies was in at the school seeing Papa and telling him about the boys. He has a high opinion of Zadok it seems. He says that the Lewis section of the Battery are looked on as the intellectuals which is what one would expect. I saw Mr. Menzies at the sale and he told me that he discovered in conversation with Papa that he knows far more about the boys than their padre did… Stornoway, 13th December. 1917

Sònraichte Project Open Days at the Museum

Thank you! To all the people that came to the Open Days at the museum, where we had interesting chats about the project, archaeology, and the many objects we have at the museum storage. Not everything we keep at the … Continue reading

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On Friday evening I was at the meeting of the Y.M.C.A. committee. They were making arrangements for the social meetings of the naval men during the Xmas and New Year weeks. The leading part was being taken by Mr. Crow, an Episcopal clergyman of the Seamen’s Mission… Stornoway, 9th December. 1917

Mr Gibson reports to Jean on the comings and goings of the week, as well as discussing the topics up for debate at The Literary which he regularly attends. This week they discussed ‘compulsory rationing’ and it would seem most … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on On Friday evening I was at the meeting of the Y.M.C.A. committee. They were making arrangements for the social meetings of the naval men during the Xmas and New Year weeks. The leading part was being taken by Mr. Crow, an Episcopal clergyman of the Seamen’s Mission… Stornoway, 9th December. 1917

Dr. Norman Macphail was in school seeing Papa this week. He has been at Passen-chdale [sic] and had a rather awful time but is expecting to be kept in England for the next few months. He says Lawrence Bain is in Italy. Lawrence will be glad as he was very tired of France… Stornoway, 4th December. 1917

In her letter to Jean this week, Mrs Gibson gives her opinion on the United States entry to the war, as well as updating Jean on the wellbeing of a few local men who are serving abroad. Mrs Gibson has … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Dr. Norman Macphail was in school seeing Papa this week. He has been at Passen-chdale [sic] and had a rather awful time but is expecting to be kept in England for the next few months. He says Lawrence Bain is in Italy. Lawrence will be glad as he was very tired of France… Stornoway, 4th December. 1917

So you saw the Salary Committee’s Report and Scheme. I am not sure which of the grades this school will be regarded as coming under. In most cases the proposed increases, even if granted, would not bring the teachers up to their pre-war condition owing to the fall in the buying power of money. Meantime we continue to practise thrift and wait for the good time coming…Stornoway, 2nd December. 1917

In this week’s letter, thoughts turn towards the Christmas and New Year holiday when Jean will be returning home to her parents. Mr Gibson also mentions a visit from the Food Control official and a report on proposed increases for … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on So you saw the Salary Committee’s Report and Scheme. I am not sure which of the grades this school will be regarded as coming under. In most cases the proposed increases, even if granted, would not bring the teachers up to their pre-war condition owing to the fall in the buying power of money. Meantime we continue to practise thrift and wait for the good time coming…Stornoway, 2nd December. 1917

We were greatly distressed yesterday when news came to the town of the death in action of Willie P. Macleod in Mesopotamia on Nov. 4. He would never have heard of Dawtie’s death. Papa had a letter from him last week and posted a letter to him on Sunday night. He wrote in good health and spirits. We are afraid to think of his poor mother and sister… Stornoway, 29th November. 1917

In Mrs Gibson’s short letter this week, she passes on the sad news of another death of a local lad who was killed in action in Mesopotamia. She also brings Jean up to speed on some of the social gatherings … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on We were greatly distressed yesterday when news came to the town of the death in action of Willie P. Macleod in Mesopotamia on Nov. 4. He would never have heard of Dawtie’s death. Papa had a letter from him last week and posted a letter to him on Sunday night. He wrote in good health and spirits. We are afraid to think of his poor mother and sister… Stornoway, 29th November. 1917

The town has been out of flour and butter this last week. Fortunately the bakers have evidently had a supply, as the bread issue has continued. The voluntary ration of Sir Yapp Mamma has pinned up beside the fireplace in the kitchen and we were counting up at teatime to see if we had kept within it. We found we had kept well within the limit in everything except perhaps sugar. It looks as if Rhondha (I can’t remember how he spells his name, but that doesn’t look right) would have to face compulsory rationing, much as he wished to avoid it… Stornoway, 24th November. 1917

This week’s letter from Mr Gibson includes some updates on local lads who are away at war and the poor state of the ration supplies in the town. There is news of a scarlet fever outbreak that the schools have … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on The town has been out of flour and butter this last week. Fortunately the bakers have evidently had a supply, as the bread issue has continued. The voluntary ration of Sir Yapp Mamma has pinned up beside the fireplace in the kitchen and we were counting up at teatime to see if we had kept within it. We found we had kept well within the limit in everything except perhaps sugar. It looks as if Rhondha (I can’t remember how he spells his name, but that doesn’t look right) would have to face compulsory rationing, much as he wished to avoid it… Stornoway, 24th November. 1917

Think you’ve found some archaeology?

The Outer Hebrides has a long history of human occupation much of which is still buried under the sand and peat, yet to be discovered.  There is a chance you might find something interesting while hiking; especially if known archaeological … Continue reading

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We had a visit last night from Miss Bell Ann Morison’s brother from the front. He was badly gassed and has been in hospital for a long time. His eyes are funny yet and he expects to be sent to a camp in Ireland… Stornoway, 22nd November. 1917

In Mrs Gibson’s letter to Jean this week, we hear news regarding a local lad who was badly gassed on the Front. Mrs Gibson also gives Jean an update on the painters, the weather and a recent, popular lecture on … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on We had a visit last night from Miss Bell Ann Morison’s brother from the front. He was badly gassed and has been in hospital for a long time. His eyes are funny yet and he expects to be sent to a camp in Ireland… Stornoway, 22nd November. 1917

John M. MacCallum, wounded, from the Canadians, and Rae Macdonald, home after being blown up, were in seeing me on Friday. A son of Colin Macleod’s from the Canadians we were speaking to to-day. He has been badly wounded and will get his discharge after going back to Canada. Mr. Matthew Morrison, Miss Gina’s brother, is home on leave. He is looking well…Stornoway, 18th November. 1917

Mr Gibson writes to Jean this week regarding the welfare of three young men who have been away at war. He is also very excited to hear about Jean’s latest studies on the ‘wattle bagworm’, so much so that he … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on John M. MacCallum, wounded, from the Canadians, and Rae Macdonald, home after being blown up, were in seeing me on Friday. A son of Colin Macleod’s from the Canadians we were speaking to to-day. He has been badly wounded and will get his discharge after going back to Canada. Mr. Matthew Morrison, Miss Gina’s brother, is home on leave. He is looking well…Stornoway, 18th November. 1917